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Lancashire Sketches by Edwin Waugh

Lancashire Sketches - Edwin WaughIn this volume, relating to a district with which the writer was intimately acquainted, he has gathered up a few points of local interest, and, in connection with these, he has endeavoured to embody something of the traits of life in South Lancashire with descriptions of its scenery, and with such gleanings from its local history as bore upon the subject, and, under the circumstances, were available to him.

Waugh is commemorated on the Rochdale Dialect Writers’ Memorial,

“In grateful memory of four Rochdale writers of the Lancashire dialect who have preserved for our children in verse and prose that will not die, the strength and tenderness, the gravity and humours of the folk of our day, in the tongue and talk of the people.”
Erected in the year 1900.

  • Chapel Island
  • Ramble from Bury to Rochdale
  • The Cottage of Tim Bobbin
  • The Birthplace of Tim Bobbin
  • Ramble from Rochdale to the Top of Blackstone Edge
  • The Town of Heywood and its Neighbourhood
  • The Grislehurst Boggart
  • Boggat Ho’ Clough
  • Rostherne Mere
  • Oliver Fernleaf’s Watch
  • Norbeck
  • Wails of the Workless Poor
  • A Wayside Incident During the Cotton Famine
  • Saint Catherine’s Chapel
  • The Knocker-Up
  • The Complaint of a Sad Complaint
  • Firelit Shed
  • Dulesgate
  • Pilling Moss
  • The Forest of Rossendale
  • Tattlin’ Mary
  • The Storm
  • Among the Preston Operatives

AVAILABLE AT LULU.COM – £9.99

Samuel Bamford’s Autobiography, Volume 2: Passages in the Life of a Radical

Samuel Bamford (28 February 1788 – 13 April 1872, was an English radical and writer, who was born in Middleton, Lancashire.

In August 1819, Bamford led a group from Middleton to St Peter’s Fields, to attend a meeting pressing for parliamentary reform, where they witnessed the Peterloo Massacre.

Bamford was arrested and charged with treason. Although the evidence showed that he had not been involved in the violence, he was nevertheless found guilty of inciting a riot and sentenced to a year in Lincoln gaol.

The experience of the massacre made a deep impression on Bamford, and convinced him that the state’s power would always succeed against radical militancy. He came to be seen as a voice for radical reform, but opposed to any activism that involved physical force.

Bamford was the author of poetry (mostly in standard English)but of those in dialect several showing sympathy with the conditions of the working class became widely popular.

“Passages in the Life of a Radical” covers Samuel’s life from 1815 to 1821 and his introduction into the politics that lead to his being arrested as one of the leaders of the reformers at Peterloo.

AVAILABLE AT LULU.COM – £7.99

Samuel Bamford’s Autobiography, Volume 1: Early Days

Samuel Bamford (28 February 1788 – 13 April 1872, was an English radical and writer, who was born in Middleton, Lancashire.

In August 1819, Bamford led a group from Middleton to St Peter’s Fields, to attend a meeting pressing for parliamentary reform, where they witnessed the Peterloo Massacre.

Bamford was arrested and charged with treason. Although the evidence showed that he had not been involved in the violence, he was nevertheless found guilty of inciting a riot and sentenced to a year in Lincoln gaol.

The experience of the massacre made a deep impression on Bamford, and convinced him that the state’s power would always succeed against radical militancy. He came to be seen as a voice for radical reform, but opposed to any activism that involved physical force.

Bamford was the author of poetry (mostly in standard English)but of those in dialect several showing sympathy with the conditions of the working class became widely popular.

“Early Days” covers Samuel’s life from 1788 – 1812

AVAILABLE AT LULU.COM – £7.99

Three Accounts of Peterloo and The Story of Peterloo by Francis Archibald Bruton

The Story of PeterlooA peaceful demonstration in 1819 turned to carnage when the authorities made a bungled attempt to disperse the crowd.

The Peterloo Massacre occurred at St Peter’s Field, Manchester, England, on 16 August 1819, when cavalry charged into a crowd of 60,000–80,000 that had gathered to demand the reform of parliamentary representation.

Shortly after the meeting began local magistrates called on the military authorities to arrest Hunt and several others on the hustings with him, and to disperse the crowd. Cavalry charged into the crowd with sabres drawn, and in the ensuing confusion, 15 people (including women and children) were killed and hundreds were injured.

Within this volume are published three eyewitness reports of the event which F. A. Burton thought worthy of publication along with his “Story of Peterloo.”

AVAILABLE AT LULU.COM – £5.99

Rush-Bearing by Alfred Burton

Rush-BearingThe practice of strewing rushes in church as a primitive carpet has long since passed into history but the rush-bearing tradition is still upheld in a few towns in Lancashire and Yorkshire.

Many of our old customs are fading away into the dim mists of antiquity, and all but the name will soon be forgotten. This is much to be regretted, because they were attended with a great deal of pure enjoyment, and were looked forward to by the people for weeks before the event.

One of these is the old custom of strewing rushes, and its attendant ceremony of the rush-bearing, with its quaint rush-cart and fantastic morris-dancers.

Once common to the whole country, it now lingers only in a few isolated places, principally in the hill districts of Lancashire and Yorkshire.

AVAILABLE AT LULU.COM – £6.99

Also available for Kindle

Rush-bearing

The Uppermill Rush-Cart 1880

The Uppermill Rush-Cart 1880

During the middle-ages it was common for the floors of buildings to be no more than compacted earth. To stop the floor getting muddy in wet weather and to insulate the rooms, rushes or hay were put down (sometimes mixed with herbs and flowers to freshen the air). This floor-covering was known as thresh and a piece of wood or stone put across the bottom of a doorway to keep the thresh inside was known as a threshold.

Seats were not provided in church until the 15th century and even if the floors were flagged the excessive cold after long standing and the kneeling required during devotions necessitated the floor being covered.

The renewal of the rushes at the church commonly coincided with the Saint’s Day to which the church was dedicated and the corresponding “Wake,” the custom quickly developed into a part of the religious festival.

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