John Bright by Charles Anthony Vince

Book Cover: John Bright by Charles Anthony Vince
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2013: £ 8.00
ISBN: 9781291642278
Pages: 148

Biography of John Bright, British Radical and Liberal statesman, one of the greatest orators of his generation, In partnership with Richard Cobden, he founded the Anti-Corn Law League.

In 1843 Bright was the Free Trade candidate at a by-election at Durham. He was defeated, but his successful competitor was unseated on petition, and at the second contest Bright was returned. In the Anti-Corn Law movement the two speakers, Cobden and Bright, complemented of each other. Cobden did the reasoning, Bright supplied the declamation, but mingled argument with appeal. No orator of modern times rose more rapidly. From 1847 until 1857 he was MP for Manchester, but his unpopular opposition of the Crimean War lost him his seat but a few months later he was returned unopposed as one of the two MPs for Birmingham. Bright died at his home One Ash on 27 March 1889 and was buried in the graveyard of the meeting-house of the Religious Society of Friends in Rochdale.

Guy Fawkes or a Complete History of the Gunporder Treason by Thomas Lathbury

Book Cover: Guy Fawkes or a Complete History of the Gunporder Treason by Thomas Lathbury
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 7.99
ISBN: 9781326044947
Pages: 104

The Gunpowder Plot of 1605, was a failed assassination attempt against King James I of England and VI of Scotland by a group of provincial English Catholics led by Robert Catesby.

The plan was to blow up the House of Lords during the State Opening of England's Parliament on 5 November 1605, as the prelude to a popular revolt in the Midlands during which James's nine-year-old daughter, Princess Elizabeth, was to be installed as the Catholic head of state.

The plot was revealed to the authorities in an anonymous letter. During a search of the House of Lords at about midnight on 4 November 1605, Fawkes was discovered guarding 36 barrels of gunpowder and arrested.

At the trial of the conspirators on 27 January 1606, eight of the survivors, including Fawkes, were convicted and sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered.