Traditions, Superstitions and Folk-Lore by Charles Hardwick

Book Cover: Traditions, Superstitions and Folk-Lore by Charles Hardwick
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 9.99
ISBN: 9781291702163
Pages: 261

Folk-Lore (Chiefly Lancashire and the North of England)

Our nursery legends and popular superstitions are fast becoming matters of history, except in the more remote and secluded portions of the country. But now that the light of modern investigation, and especially that ray furnished by recent discoveries in philological science, has been directed towards their deeper and more hidden mysteries, profound philosophical historians have begun to discover that from this apparently desolate literary region much reliable knowledge may be extracted, leading to conclusions of the most interesting and important kind, with reference to the early history of our race.

The Sword Dances of Northern England Together With The Horn Dance of Abbots Bromley by Cecil J. Sharp

Book Cover: The Sword Dances of Northern England Together With The Horn Dance of Abbots Bromley by Cecil J. Sharp
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 7.99
ISBN: 9781291736441
Pages: 139

Cecil Sharp’s collection of Sword Dances.

A collection of Sword-Dances and accompanying music collected, described and arranged by Cecil J. Sharp. Long-Sword Dances The Kirby Malzeard Sword-Dance The Grenoside Sword-Dance Short-Sword Dances The Swalwell Sword-Dance The Earsdon Sword-Dance Also The Abbots Bromley Sword Dance

This edition also incorporates the accompanying Songs and Dance Airs.

Old English Customs Extant at the Present Time– P. H. Ditchfield

Book Cover: Old English Customs Extant at the Present Time– P. H. Ditchfield
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 8.99
ISBN: 9781326072643
Pages: 186

Many customs have vanished, quietly dying out without giving a sign. The present generation has witnessed the extinction of many observances which our fathers practised and revered, and doubtless the progress of decay will continue.

We have entered upon a diminished inheritance. Still it is surprising to find how much has been left; how tenaciously the English race clings to that which habit and usage have established; how ancient customs hold sway in the palace, the parliament, the army, the law courts, amongst educated people as well as unlearned rustics; how they cluster around our social institutions, are enshrined in religious ceremonial, and are preserved by law; how carefully they have been guarded through the many ages of their existence, and how deeply rooted they are in the affections of the English people.