The Lancashire Witches A Romance of Pendle Forest by William Harrison Ainsworth

Book Cover: The Lancashire Witches A Romance of Pendle Forest by William Harrison Ainsworth
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 16.99 GBP
ISBN: 9781291935172
Pages: 549

A factually based novel centred around the Lancashire Witch Trials.

The novel is based on the true story of the Pendle witches, who were executed in 1612 for causing harm by witchcraft. Modern critics such as David Punter consider the book to be Ainsworth’s best work.

The subject of the Pendle witches was suggested to Ainsworth by antiquarian and long-time friend James Crossley, President of the Chetham Society.

During 1846 and 1847 Ainsworth visited all of the major sites involved in the story, such as Pendle Hill and Malkin Tower, home of the Demdikes, one of the two families accused of witchcraft.

He wrote the story in 1848, when it was serialised in the Sunday Times newspaper.

Guy Fawkes or a Complete History of the Gunporder Treason by Thomas Lathbury

Book Cover: Guy Fawkes or a Complete History of the Gunporder Treason by Thomas Lathbury
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 7.99 GBP
ISBN: 9781326044947
Pages: 104

The Gunpowder Plot of 1605, was a failed assassination attempt against King James I of England and VI of Scotland by a group of provincial English Catholics led by Robert Catesby.

The plan was to blow up the House of Lords during the State Opening of England's Parliament on 5 November 1605, as the prelude to a popular revolt in the Midlands during which James's nine-year-old daughter, Princess Elizabeth, was to be installed as the Catholic head of state.

The plot was revealed to the authorities in an anonymous letter. During a search of the House of Lords at about midnight on 4 November 1605, Fawkes was discovered guarding 36 barrels of gunpowder and arrested.

At the trial of the conspirators on 27 January 1606, eight of the survivors, including Fawkes, were convicted and sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered.

The Digger Movement in the Days of the Commonwealth by Lewis H. Berens

Book Cover: The Digger Movement in the Days of the Commonwealth by Lewis H. Berens
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 11.99 GBP
ISBN: 9781326060718
Pages: 317

In 1649 Gerrard Winstanley and 14 others published a pamphlet in which they called themselves the “True Levellers” although once they began to put those beliefs into practice they soon became known by supporters and opponents as “Diggers”.

The Diggers’ beliefs envisioned an ecological interrelationship between humans and nature, acknowledging the inherent connections between people and their surroundings.

Winstanley declared that “true freedom lies where a man receives his nourishment and preservation, and that is in the use of the earth”.

In April 1649 several Diggers had begun to plant vegetables in common land on St George’s Hill, Weybridge, Surrey at a time when food prices reached an all-time high. They had invited “all to come in and help them, and promise them meat, drink, and clothes.”