John Bright by Charles Anthony Vince

Book Cover: John Bright by Charles Anthony Vince
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2013: £ 8.00
ISBN: 9781291642278
Pages: 148

Biography of John Bright, British Radical and Liberal statesman, one of the greatest orators of his generation, In partnership with Richard Cobden, he founded the Anti-Corn Law League.

In 1843 Bright was the Free Trade candidate at a by-election at Durham. He was defeated, but his successful competitor was unseated on petition, and at the second contest Bright was returned. In the Anti-Corn Law movement the two speakers, Cobden and Bright, complemented of each other. Cobden did the reasoning, Bright supplied the declamation, but mingled argument with appeal. No orator of modern times rose more rapidly. From 1847 until 1857 he was MP for Manchester, but his unpopular opposition of the Crimean War lost him his seat but a few months later he was returned unopposed as one of the two MPs for Birmingham. Bright died at his home One Ash on 27 March 1889 and was buried in the graveyard of the meeting-house of the Religious Society of Friends in Rochdale.

Samuel Bamford’s Autobiography, Volume 1: Early Days

Book Cover: Samuel Bamford’s Autobiography, Volume 1: Early Days
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 9.99
ISBN: 9781291951394
Pages: 183

Samuel Bamford (28 February 1788 – 13 April 1872, was an English radical and writer, who was born in Middleton, Lancashire.

In August 1819, Bamford led a group from Middleton to St Peter’s Fields, to attend a meeting pressing for parliamentary reform, where they witnessed the Peterloo Massacre.

Bamford was arrested and charged with treason. Although the evidence showed that he had not been involved in the violence, he was nevertheless found guilty of inciting a riot and sentenced to a year in Lincoln gaol.

The experience of the massacre made a deep impression on Bamford, and convinced him that the state’s power would always succeed against radical militancy. He came to be seen as a voice for radical reform, but opposed to any activism that involved physical force.

Bamford was the author of poetry (mostly in standard English)but of those in dialect several showing sympathy with the conditions of the working class became widely popular.

“Early Days” covers Samuel’s life from 1788 – 1812

Samuel Bamford’s Autobiography, Volume 2: Passages in the Life of a Radical

Book Cover: Samuel Bamford’s Autobiography, Volume 2: Passages in the Life of a Radical
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 9.99
ISBN: 9781291951417
Pages: 262

Samuel Bamford (28 February 1788 – 13 April 1872, was an English radical and writer, who was born in Middleton, Lancashire.

In August 1819, Bamford led a group from Middleton to St Peter’s Fields, to attend a meeting pressing for parliamentary reform, where they witnessed the Peterloo Massacre.

Bamford was arrested and charged with treason. Although the evidence showed that he had not been involved in the violence, he was nevertheless found guilty of inciting a riot and sentenced to a year in Lincoln gaol.

The experience of the massacre made a deep impression on Bamford, and convinced him that the state’s power would always succeed against radical militancy. He came to be seen as a voice for radical reform, but opposed to any activism that involved physical force.

Bamford was the author of poetry (mostly in standard English)but of those in dialect several showing sympathy with the conditions of the working class became widely popular.

“Passages in the Life of a Radical” covers Samuel’s life from 1815 to 1821 and his introduction into the politics that lead to his being arrested as one of the leaders of the reformers at Peterloo.