The Sword Dances of Northern England Together With The Horn Dance of Abbots Bromley by Cecil J. Sharp

Book Cover: The Sword Dances of Northern England Together With The Horn Dance of Abbots Bromley by Cecil J. Sharp
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 7.99 GBP
ISBN: 9781291736441
Pages: 139

Cecil Sharp’s collection of Sword Dances.

A collection of Sword-Dances and accompanying music collected, described and arranged by Cecil J. Sharp. Long-Sword Dances The Kirby Malzeard Sword-Dance The Grenoside Sword-Dance Short-Sword Dances The Swalwell Sword-Dance The Earsdon Sword-Dance Also The Abbots Bromley Sword Dance

This edition also incorporates the accompanying Songs and Dance Airs.

Rush-Bearing by Alfred Burton

Book Cover: Rush-Bearing by Alfred Burton
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 7.99 GBP
ISBN: 9781291941807
Pages: 158

The practice of strewing rushes in church as a primitive carpet has long since passed into history but the rush-bearing tradition is still upheld in a few towns in Lancashire and Yorkshire.

Many of our old customs are fading away into the dim mists of antiquity, and all but the name will soon be forgotten. This is much to be regretted, because they were attended with a great deal of pure enjoyment, and were looked forward to by the people for weeks before the event.

One of these is the old custom of strewing rushes, and its attendant ceremony of the rush-bearing, with its quaint rush-cart and fantastic morris-dancers.

Once common to the whole country, it now lingers only in a few isolated places, principally in the hill districts of Lancashire and Yorkshire.

Old English Customs Extant at the Present Time– P. H. Ditchfield

Book Cover: Old English Customs Extant at the Present Time– P. H. Ditchfield
Editions:Paperback - FolkCustoms 2014: £ 8.99 GBP
ISBN: 9781326072643
Pages: 186

Many customs have vanished, quietly dying out without giving a sign. The present generation has witnessed the extinction of many observances which our fathers practised and revered, and doubtless the progress of decay will continue.

We have entered upon a diminished inheritance. Still it is surprising to find how much has been left; how tenaciously the English race clings to that which habit and usage have established; how ancient customs hold sway in the palace, the parliament, the army, the law courts, amongst educated people as well as unlearned rustics; how they cluster around our social institutions, are enshrined in religious ceremonial, and are preserved by law; how carefully they have been guarded through the many ages of their existence, and how deeply rooted they are in the affections of the English people.